Marquette, Ludington, Lake Isabella, Acme Twp. and Owosso join the growing list of supportive communities!

A roadway in need of complete streets in Acme Township. (photo by glhjr)

While we have been a little behind in updating this site the past few weeks, it certainly doesn’t mean there hasn’t been news worth posting about complete streets in Michigan.  In fact, we are pleased to report that there have been five complete streets resolutions adopted across the state recently.

On May 9th, both the Cities of Marquette and Ludington adopted complete streets resolutions at their respective City Council meetings.  The Mining Journal and the Ludington Daily News both covered the passage of these resolutions.

We also received word this month from Lake Isabella Village Manager Tim Wolff that their Village Council also adopted a complete streets resolution.

As reported on My Wheels are Turning, Acme Township became the first community in Grand Traverse County to endorse Complete Streets at their June 7th Board of Trustees meeting.  They join a handful of other townships across the state who have also recently adopted complete streets resolutions.  While we are extremely encouraged by the action of these communities, it still remains to be seen what sort of impact these policies will ultimately have since county road commissions actually are the ones who have jurisdiction over roads within townships.  Ultimately we hope that we are seeing the beginning of a fruitful dialog between Michigan’s 1200+ townships and the 80+ county road commissions.

It also looks like we might see more complete streets policies coming out of northern Michigan in the near future.  According to the Petoskey News Northeast Michigan Council of Governments and Michigan Trails & Greenways Alliance are cooperating to offer complete streets training sessions in Emmet and Alpena Counties at the end of this month.

And lastly, as we reported yesterday, Owosso also recently adopted a complete streets resolution.  This brings Michigan to a total of 38 known local resolutions and six ordinances in addition to our statewide law.  According to Holly Madill, Complete Streets Project Coordinator for the Michigan Department of Community Health, approximately 2,659,080 people, 27% of Michigan’s population now lives in a community that has endorsed complete streets either through a resolution or ordinance.

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